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Thursday, October 31, 2013

HF Virtual Book Tours: A Divided Inheritance by Deborah Swift

Title: A Divided Inheritance
Author:  Deborah Swift
Format: Paperback
Publisher: Pan MacMillan
Publish Date: October 24, 2013
Source: HF Virtual Book Tours






Why You're Reading This Book:

  • You're a historical fiction fan.
  • You like armchair traveling.
What's the Story?:

From Goodreads.com: "Elspet Leviston’s greatest ambition is to continue the success of her father Nathaniel’s lace business. But her dreams are thrown into turmoil with the arrival of her mysterious cousin Zachary Deane – who has his own designs on Leviston’s Lace.

Zachary is a dedicated swordsman with a secret past that seems to invite trouble. So Nathaniel sends him on a Grand Tour, away from the distractions of Jacobean London. Elspet believes herself to be free of her hot-headed relative but when Nathaniel dies her fortunes change dramatically. She is forced to leave her beloved home and go in search of Zachary - determined to claim back from him the inheritance that is rightfully hers.

Under the searing Spanish sun, Elspet and Zachary become locked in a battle of wills. But these are dangerous times and they are soon embroiled in the roar and sweep of something far more threatening, sending them both on an unexpected journey of discovery which finally unlocks the true meaning of family . . .

A Divided Inheritance is a breathtaking adventure set in London just after the Gunpowder Plot and in the bustling courtyards of Golden Age Seville."


My Two Cents:

"A Divided Inheritance" is the story of Elspet, a young woman who dreams of taking over her father's lace business but this is the 1600s and if there's a male heir, well you can probably guess what that means... This book follows Elspet as she navigates her divided inheritance. This book also discusses a lot about religion, which was sort of a division of the day in that time period.

I really enjoyed reading about Elspet and Zachary. I sort of wish that more of the book focused on their relationship but on the other hand, I'm not sure what I would trade out to have more focus on their relationship as I loved all of the action (and yes, there is a lot of action). Elspet believes Zachary to be her cousin but later finds out that he is more than that and therefore Elspet's father will divide his inheritance even though Elspet believes everything should go to her. Elspet could have come off as a very spoiled character but Swift allows us to see exactly where she is coming from, which really sold me on her. I loved following her throughout this book. Zachary was also fascinating to me.

The book takes place in both England and Spain. In England, Catholics (which Elspet is) are under attack and can't practice their religion as they would like. In Spain, the Catholic majority is trying to press out the Moriscos (the Muslim Moors). I really thought that Swift did a fantastic job of bringing both of these societies to life. This book allows plenty of room for some great armchair traveling to both London and Seville, Spain.

There are so many different layers to this story. There are the great characters and their personal war with each other but there are also the bigger stories of religion and war between those of different religions. It is a truly fascinating novel!
 



Follow the Rest of the Tour:

Wednesday, October 23
Review at Unabridged Chick
Thursday, October 24
Interview & Giveaway at Unabridged Chick
Friday, October 25
Review at Luxury Reading
Monday, October 28
Review at Historical Tapestry and The Adventures of an Intrepid Reader
Tuesday, October 29
Review & Guest Post at A Bookish Libraria
Guest Post at Historical Tapestry
Wednesday, October 30
Review & Giveaway at Peeking Between the Pages
Thursday, October 31
Review at The Most Happy Reader
Friday, November 1
Interview at Layered Pages
Monday, November 4
Review at Confessions of an Avid Reader
Tuesday, November 5
Guest Post at Confessions of an Avid Reader
Wednesday, November 6
Review at Flashlight Commentary
Thursday, November 7
Interview at Flashlight Commentary
Friday, November 8
Review at Sharon’s Garden of Book Reviews
Monday, November 11
Review & Giveaway at The Maiden’s Court
Tuesday, November 12
Review at Reading the Past
Wednesday, November 13
Review at The Lit Bitch
Review at Let Them Read Books
Thursday, November 14
Review & Giveaway at The Eclectic Reader
Friday, November 15
Review at Book of Secrets
Monday, November 18
Review at HF Book Muse-News
Tuesday, November 19
Review at Griperang’s Bookmarks
Guest Post at HF Book Muse-News
Wednesday, November 20
Review at Oh, for the Hook of a Book!
Thursday, November 21
Review at The Musings of ALMYBNENR
Friday, November 22
Review at The True Book Addict
Monday, November 25
Interview at Oh, for the Hook of a Book!
Tuesday, November 26
Review at So Many Books, So Little Time
Wednesday, November 27
Review at Kinx’s Book Nook
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Wednesday, October 30, 2013

HF Virtual Book Tours: Banquet of Lies by Michelle Diener

Title: Banquet of Lies
Author: Michelle Diener
Format: Paperback
Publisher: Gallery Books
Publish Date: October 22, 2013
Source: HF Virtual Book Tours






Why You're Reading This Book:

  • You're a historical fiction fan.
What's the Story?:

From Goodreads.com: "LONDON, 1812: Giselle Barrington is living a double life, juggling the duties of chef with those of spy catcher. She must identify her father’s savage killer before the shadowy man finds her and uncovers the explosive political document her father entrusted to her safekeeping.

Posing as a French cook in the home of Lord Aldridge, Giselle is surrounded by unlikely allies and vicious enemies. In the streets where she once walked freely among polite society, she now hides in plain sight, learning the hard lessons of class distinction and negotiating the delicate balance between servant and master.

Lord Aldridge’s insatiable curiosity about his mysterious new chef blurs the line between civic duty and outright desire. Carefully watching Giselle’s every move, he undertakes a mission to figure out who she really is—and, in the process, plunges her straight into the heart of danger when her only hope for survival is to remain invisible."


My Two Cents: 

"Banquet of Lies" is Michelle Diener's latest release. This historical fiction book follows Giselle, a brave young woman, who is trying to hide from the person who killed her father all while protecting an incredibly important document.

I've read a couple of Ms. Diener's books by now and one thing that I really have enjoyed about her book (and I've liked a lot of things about her books) is the great characters. I really, really liked Gigi. She is one brave lady. She also has a quick wit, which I appreciated! It would have been so easy for her to just hide but she realizes the mission that her father was on and duty comes before safety, which made for a thoroughly engaging and exciting read!

The setting of the book was fascinating for me. I haven't read a lot of books set in the early 1800s and I love just about anything set in London. I love visiting some place new through books. This book definitely did that for me, which was very exciting!

Umm, and also Gigi is acting as a cook for Lord Aldridge, which means that this book is chock full of delicious food. I don't know about you but as a foodie, any book with delicious food is also very exciting for me.

Overall, this was a fun adventure!






Follow the Rest of the Tour:


Monday, October 21
Review at Unabridged Chick
Review & Giveaway at The Maiden’s Court
Tuesday, October 22
Review at Historical Tapestry and The Adventures of an Intrepid Reader
Interview & Giveaway at Unabridged Chick
Wednesday, October 23
Review & Giveaway at Luxury Reading
Thursday, October 24
Review & Giveaway at The Lit Bitch
Interview at Linus’s Blanket
Friday, October 25
Review & Giveaway at A Bookish Libraria
Interview at Historical Tapestry
Monday, October 28
Review at Griperang’s Bookmarks
Review & Giveaway at Peeking Between the Pages
Tuesday, October 29
Review at Oh, for the Hook of a Book!
Wednesday, October 30
Review at A Bookish Affair
Interview & Giveaway at Oh, for the Hook of a Book!
Thursday, October 31
Review & Giveaway at Confessions of an Avid Reader
Friday, November 1
Review at Peppermint, Ph.D.
Interview & Giveaway at A Bookish Affair
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Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Review: Lily of the Nile by Stephanie Dray

Title: Lily of the Nile
Author: Stephanie Dray
Format: Paperback
Publisher: Berkley Trade
Publish Date: January 4, 2011
Source: Owned






Why You're Reading This Book:

  • You're a historical fiction fan.
What's the Story?:

From Goodreads.com: "To Isis worshippers, Princess Selene and her twin brother Helios embody the divine celestial pair who will bring about a Golden Age. But when Selene's parents are vanquished by Rome, her auspicious birth becomes a curse. Trapped in an empire that reviles her heritage and suspects her faith, the young messianic princess struggles for survival in a Roman court of intrigue. She can't hide the hieroglyphics that carve themselves into her hands, nor can she stop the emperor from using her powers for his own ends. But faced with a new and ruthless Caesar who is obsessed with having a Cleopatra of his very own, Selene is determined to resurrect her mother's dreams. Can she succeed where her mother failed? And what will it cost her in a political game where the only rule is win-or die?"

My Two Cents:

"Lily of the Nile" definitely ranks amongst one of the books where I am not sure why I waited so long to read it! You all know that I absolutely love historical fiction but I usually don't read a lot of historical fiction that takes place in ancient times. Books like "Lily of the Nile" definitely open me up to trying to find more that takes place during historical fiction.

The story is told from the perspective of Cleopatra Selene, the daughter of the famous Cleopatra. When her mother chooses to kill herself after Antony dies, Cleopatra Selene and her brothers are sent to Rome to become wards of the Roman emperor. That in itself is a hard road to travel as the emperor was not all that fond of Cleopatra and in many, many cases seems to take that out on her children, especially Cleopatra Selene. I loved her character so much. Even with all she has been through and all she is going through in Rome, she is incredibly strong and resilient. This girl seriously knows how to roll with the punches!

I am also a huge fan of magical realism, which this book has quite a bit of. Cleopatra Selene becomes a symbol for those that worship the goddess, Isis, and there are a lot of sort of magical things that happen in this book because of that. I thought Dray did a really good job of making it feel like the magic belonged there and wasn't totally out of left field. She uses a mix of interesting historical detail and great story telling skills to make this element of the story come to life.

This is the first book in a planned trilogy. The second book, "Song of the Nile," has already been released and the the third book, "Daughter of the Nile," was just recently announced. All I know is that I am looking forward to reading both. My only regret in not reading "Lily of the Nile" later is that now I know that I have to wait until the final book comes out. Woe is me!

Bottom line: This is a very promising start to a series about a fascinating character!


  

Monday, October 28, 2013

Odds and Ends and Giveaway Winners

Something you all may not know about me is that aside from books, I also absolutely love purses and bags. I have my fancy purses but I also love a good tote bag (hey, I need to carry my books!). When I saw that Strand bookstore, the ultimate NYC city book mecca, and Kate Spade, who has made some of my very favorite bags, had joined up to offer tote bags full of books and bookish items centered around different topics, I had to treat myself. I called it a late birthday present!


I chose the travel topic and got the tote bag, a mug, a little pencil bag, and three books. I love a good surprise!

I'm also still going strong with the Coursera course on Historical Fiction, entitled Plagues, Witches, and War: The Worlds of Historical Fiction. I'm learning a ton and I've found that lately when I'm reading my beloved HF books, I'm thinking about some of the things that I've learned in the course. Talk about applying lessons right away!

The end of this week will bring another beginning of NaNoWriMo (are any of you participating this year??? Let's be writing buddies!). I'm excited and hoping that I can win again this year. Last year was my first year. This year, I'm planning to write in a completely new genre - sci-fi!

Giveaway Winners:

I also have several giveaway winners to announce!

A Wilder Rose:
Manda D.

Forgetting Tabitha:
Kassandra A.

Confessions of Marie Antoinette:
Lara N.

Under the Wire:
Carol W.

Review: The Secret Daughter of the Tsar by Jennifer Laam

Title: The Secret Daughter of the Tsar
Author: Jennifer Laam
Format: Paperback
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin
Publish Date: October 22, 2013
Source: I received a copy from the publisher; however, this did not affect my review.



Why You're Reading This Book:

  • You're a historical fiction fan.
What's the Story?:

From Goodreads.com: "
In her riveting debut novel, The Secret Daughter of the Tsar, Jennifer Laam seamlessly braids together the stories of three women: Veronica, Lena, and Charlotte. Veronica is an aspiring historian living in present-day Los Angeles when she meets a mysterious man who may be heir to the Russian throne. As she sets about investigating the legitimacy of his claim through a winding path of romance and deception, the ghosts of her own past begin to haunt her. Lena, a servant in the imperial Russian court of 1902, is approached by the desperate Empress Alexandra.  After conceiving four daughters, the Empress is determined to sire a son and believes Lena can help her. Once elevated to the Romanov’s treacherous inner circle, Lena finds herself under the watchful eye of the meddling Dowager Empress Marie. Charlotte, a former ballerina living in World War II occupied Paris, receives a surprise visit from a German officer. Determined to protect her son from the Nazis, Charlotte escapes the city, but not before learning that the officer’s interest in her stems from his longstanding obsession with the fate of the Russian monarchy. Then as Veronica's passion intensifies, and her search for the true heir to the throne takes a dangerous turn, the reader learns just how these three vastly different women are connected. The Secret Daughter of the Tsar is thrilling from its first intense moments until its final, unexpected conclusion."


My Two Cents:

"The Secret Daughter of the Tsar" is an alternate history of the Romanov family, Russia's last royal rulers. I was excited about this book because I am absolutely fascinated with Russia and its history, especially during the 20th century to present day. I'm always excited when I can find a historical fiction that takes on Russia (there aren't that many out there!!! why???). Alternate histories are a little bit more dicey for me usually. It's sometimes hard for me to get into the mindset of suspending my disbelief about histories that I know fairly well. In the case of this book, I totally ate this book up!

The narrative is split between three main characters. There is Lena, servant to the Romanov family, who becomes a close confidante of the last Tsarina, Alexandra. There is Charlotte, a young woman in 1940s, who is being followed by a Nazi officer who seems to be convinced that she is someone who she's sure she isn't. Then there is Veronica, a Russian history professor at a small college, who meets a mysterious man who may be hiding a huge family secret. All three of these women come from very different walks of life and they are all really fascinating. There were a lot of really fantastic twists and turns surrounding these characters and I loved following them and putting the pieces together.

The story of this book was fascinating. Yes, it's an alternate history but Lamm does a great job at making the story feel like it could be plausible. Many of us history lovers have heard about the various pretenders who claimed to be one of the Tsar's daughters (mostly Anastasia) but this book has a slightly different take, which makes it even more fascinating.

Overall, this book has a great storyline and a really interesting take on an infamous family!


 

Review: In Pursuit by Sharman Burson Ramsey

Title: In Pursuit
Author: Sharman Burson Ramsey
Format: Paperback
Publisher: Mercer University Press
Publish Date: September 30, 2013
Source: I received a copy from the author and publisher; however, this did not affect my review.






Why You're Reading This Book:

  • You're a historical fiction fan.
  • You're looking for adventure!
What's the Story?:

From Goodreads.com: "Creek half-breed and survivor of the Creek Indian War, Joie Kincaid and the nemesis she rescued from certain death after the Massacre at Fort Mims are kidnapped from a tea room in London. Joie awakens with amnesia after having been struck on the headto find herself in the hold of a ship sailing to the pirate Gasparilla's lair in Charlotte Harbour and bound to a man she finds strangely familiar."

My Two Cents:

"In Pursuit" is the follow up to Sharman Burson Ramsey's "Swimming With Serpents." In this historical fiction book, survivor of the Creek Indian War Joie Kincaid finds herself in England where the adventure of her life is not over yet when she gets taken by pirates! Cunning and adventures on the high seas await! She's gotten through hard things before but this latest situation could be the end. Even though this is the second book in this series, you can definitely read "In Pursuit" without reading the first book. I really want to go back and read the first book.

The characters in this book were great. Joie is such a strong character and I really liked following her. I really thought that Ramsey did a good job of showing where Joie came from and what her situation back in America was like and how it shaped her outlook in this book. I also really, really liked the relationship between Joie and Godfrey. Joie saved Godfrey before and when they rejoin in "In Pursuit," it's his turn to save her. I loved seeing how their relationship grew throughout the book.

I loved the inclusion of the pirates in the book. They play a huge role in this book. One of the things that I love about historical-fiction is when you get to learn something new. This book definitely had that for me. This book captures a really interesting point in history!

Overall, this is a great story with a ton of adventure!


 

Sunday, October 27, 2013

Review: The Mountain of Light by Indu Sundaresan

Title: The Mountain of Light
Author: Indu Sundaresan
Format: Paperback
Publisher: Washington Square Press
Publish Date: October 8, 2013
Source: I received a copy from the publisher; however, this did not affect my review.





Why You're Reading This Book:

  • You're a historical fiction fan.
  • You love armchair traveling.
 What's the Story?:

From Goodreads.com: "As empires rose and fell and mighty kings jostled for power, its glittering radiance never dimmed. It is the “Mountain of Light”—the Kohinoor diamond—and its facets reflect a sweeping story of love, adventure, conquest and betrayal. Its origins are the stuff of myth, but for centuries this spectacular gem changes hands from one ruler to another in India, Persia, and Afghanistan. In 1850, the ancient stone is sent halfway around the world where it will play a pivotal role in the intertwined destinies of a boy-king of India and a young queen of England—a queen who claims the Mountain of Light and India itself for her own burgeoning empire, the most brilliant jewels in her imperial crown.

The Mountain of Light is a magnificent story of loss and recovery, sweeping change and enduring truth, wrapped around the glowing heart of one of the world’s most famous diamonds."


My Two Cents:

"The Mountain of Light" is the story of the Kohnihoor diamond, which was once considered the largest diamond in the world. The book follows the diamond's movement from India to England and shows how it affects the lives of those that come into contact with it. This is a fascinating historical fiction about a famous stone and has some really fantastic settings that will appeal to my fellow armchair travelers!

The settings were the best part of the book for me. I absolutely love armchair traveling so I was very excited for this book because of that. I've been loving historical fiction set in Asia for awhile now so I was happy to get back to it. Sundaresan really did a good job with bringing the setting to life for me.

Because this is really a historical fiction centering on an item and following that item for almost 300 years, I was a little bit out at sea with this book. I usually prefer my novels character driven. The diamond is really the constant throughout this book, which I'm not sure I liked. It was interesting learning about the different rulers and people that came into contact with the diamond but I found myself wanting to know more about them than the diamond. Nonetheless, the "mountain of light" has had a fascinating history and I did enjoy learning a little bit more about it.


 

Friday, October 25, 2013

Where In The World Is Archetype? Blog Tour: Archetype by M.D. Waters

Title: Archetype
Author: M.D. Waters
Format: ARC
Publisher: Dutton
Publish Date: February 6, 2014 (Add to your TBR list now; this book is so worth it)
Source: Where In The World Is Archetype? Blog Tour






Why You're Reading This Book:

  • You're a sci-fi fan.
  • You want a book that makes you think.
What's the Story?:

From Goodreads.com: "Emma wakes in a hospital, with no memory of what came before. Her husband, Declan, a powerful, seductive man, provides her with new memories, but her dreams contradict his stories, showing her a past life she can’t believe possible: memories of war, of a camp where girls are trained to be wives, of love for another man. Something inside her tells her not to speak of this, but she does not know why. She only knows she is at war with herself.

Suppressing those dreams during daylight hours, Emma lets Declan mold her into a happily married woman and begins to fall in love with him. But the day Noah stands before her, the line between her reality and dreams shatters.

In a future where women are a rare commodity, Emma fights for freedom but is held captive by the love of two men—one her husband, the other her worst enemy. If only she could remember which is which. . . .

The first novel in a two-part series, Archetype heralds the arrival of a truly memorable character—and the talented author who created her."


My Two Cents:

I was so excited about this book before I read it! I had heard really good things about this book. Now that I've read the book, I am just as excited but now I'm excited to tell you all about it. If you like sci-fi and dystopian books and you're looking for a really good story to get totally and utterly engrossed in, this is the book for you. Let me put it this way, I started it an afternoon after work and had to stay up late to finish it because I. Could. Not. Put. It. Down. This is serious, guys.

Oh, there are so many twists and turns in this book and it definitely kept me on my toes. I love being surprised! I loved the world in the book. It's definitely not someplace that I would ever like to live. Ms. Waters really brought this world to life for me. The world Emma Burke is one where women are a hot commodity. There aren't enough women to go around so each woman is an incredibly precious resource and meant to be protected by their men. Infertility is a huge problem in this world. Only fertile women are allowed to be married. In this world, women go to camps as girls in order to learn to be good wives to their future husbands. It's a fascinating setting but also a little bit scary! Even though this is a fictional world, it is definitely a thought provoking one.

Emma knows she was in an accident. She isn't sure what happened but when she wakes up in a hospital, she's told that she will eventually be better but in the meantime, she has horrible nightmares about places that she isn't sure she's been before and people that she isn't sure whether or not she has met them before. The nightmares feel real and it isn't long before her waking life and her nightmares come crashing together in such an amazing way.

The writing in the book is good. The book is told from the point of view of Emma, which really brought me into the story. We get to see first hand what she is feeling and thinking and we're able to put together the pieces of what happened to her alongside her. She's a really good character and I am eagerly awaiting the companion book to this one, which will be out later in 2014, I believe.

I really need my own copy of this book as I know that it's one that I'm going to want to re-read, especially since I've been through all the twists and turns once. This book is truly a treat for sci-fi and dystopian fans and I fully recommend it.


  

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Review: An Army of Judiths by C.J. Underwood

Title: An Army of Judiths
Author: C.J. Underwood
Format: Ebook
Publisher: Knox Robinson
Publish Date: September 4, 2013
Source: I received a copy from the author; however, this did not affect my review.






Why You're Reading This Book:

  • You're a historical fiction fan.
  • You like vivid settings.
  • You like memorable characters.
 What's the Story?:

From Goodreads.com: "Netherlands, 1572 Across the Low Countries, towns and cities have barricaded their gates against King Phillip II of Spain’s invading army led by the bloodthirsty Duke of Alva and his tyrannical son, Toledo. With Amsterdam subjugated, and the ongoing merciless conquest of smaller towns, Spain’s mighty foothold in the Netherlands is gaining strength. 

Discharged as governor of the Netherlands by Spain, Prince William of Orange has amassed a fleet of ‘Seabeggars’, his unofficial navy of furious and vengeful noblemen, bent on defending their faith, land and fortunes. But they are losing.  Holland is in the grip of Spain, and the grip is tightening.

The city of Haarlem, just ten miles west of Amsterdam, is in King Phillip’s way. Holland cannot be conquered without Haarlem and the Spanish army marches to take the city. As it nears Haarlem, the city is thrown into disorganized panic.

Mother, sister, widow and shipbuilder, Kenau Hasselaar is the sister-in-law of William of Orange’s physician. She has much to lose should Haarlem fall to Spain.

With a passion to rival King Phillip’s own, Kenau forms a troop of three hundred women, her Army of Judiths. Furious and driven, she trains her troops to match the Spanish invaders blow for bloody blow. With these women, Kenau launches a defense of the city in a desperate bid to protect her family, her way of life, and her beloved home."


My Two Cents:

Okay, I think I've told you guys this before but one of the things that I absolutely love about historical fiction is that oftentimes they'll introduce you to something new. It's always nice to learn a little something while you're reading for pleasure! "An Army of Judiths" was very much that kind of book for me. Before reading this book, I had no clue about the Spanish attacking the Netherlands. I got to learn about the battles raging across the country and I also got to "meet" some pretty cool characters along the way (this was definitely a win-win for me). All in all, this book is truly a treat for historical fiction lovers.

I also really liked that this story was about sisters. The story focuses on Kenau, a woman who gathers an army made up of other women to fight the Spanish (this is where the title of the book comes from). Amazingly, Kenau was a real person, which makes this story even more fantastic. Kenau is a really fantastic character. She is incredibly bold and doesn't care that she doesn't fit into the mold of what a woman should be in the late 1500s. She is patriotic and she realizes very early on that there is a lot at stake if the Spanish win. However, the story itself is narrated by Kenau's sister, Amarron, which worked so well for this story. Because Am is so close to Kenau, we get a really intimate picture of what's going on. I so enjoyed this.

I'm usually not one for books with a lot of battles so I appreciated how the author was able to to show both the battles but also the day-to-day life of the people of Haarlem as they both prepared for war and survived through the fighting. The author uses a lot of great detail so that we are able to really see what's life would have been like with so much going on!

I thoroughly enjoyed this tale!


 

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Review: A Woman's Choice by Annie Thomas

Title: A Woman's Choice
Author: Annie Thomas
Format: Ebook
Publisher: Self-published
Publish Date: July 6, 2013
Source: I received a copy from the author; however, this did not affect my review.






Why You're Reading This Book:

  • You're a historical fiction fan.
What's the Story?:

From Goodreads.com: "It is 1901. Queen Victoria is dead; a new era has begun. And on a cold April morning a young girl stands uncertainly on Liverpool Docks ready to board an emigrant ship that will take her to America and an unknown future. Michael, Luke, and Meg are amongst her fellow travellers, with the common bond that only determination and self-belief will sustain them in their new lives.

Set in the vibrancy of early twentieth century New York, the story follows Clara and the people she meets on the way, through tenement living and sweatshop labour to success in musical theatre.

But she discovers that she needs more than wealth and security to make her happy; when the past returns, she makes another choice which changes her life. Then, as the horror of World War One in Europe threatens to engulf America, Clara learns that personal lives cannot be lived apart from public events, and finds that the people she has loved, and who love her, are not always what they seem.
A Woman’s Choice is a compelling saga of friendship, love and ambition."


My Two Cents:

"A Woman's Choice" is the story of Clara, a young Irish immigrant who comes to New York City with her ailing mother to start a new life like so many other European families during the early 1900s. I've always been drawn to stories of immigrants. My own family came over to the States in the early 1900s for the most part and I have a lot of respect for those that made the choice to leave it all behind and create something new.

I really enjoyed the setting of the book. I love reading about New York City in the early 20th century. NYC is always one of my top locations to read about but NYC in the early 20th century is absolutely fascinating. You get a good sense of some of the various neighborhoods in the city. As Clara realizes not all that long after her arrival, there is a lot of different ethnicities in the city and they are often very segregated, never to mix.

The book covers several years in Clara's life and I really enjoyed being able to see her and some of the other people that she meets along the way grow and change. We get to see her grow up and fall in love and change even after she finds love. Ultimately this culminates in the choice referenced by the title.

The writing of this book was okay. I thought that there was a lot of telling rather than showing in this book. Every emotion and thought was on display for each of the characters. I wish that there had been more conclusions left for the reader to come to.

Overall, this was an interesting story!


 

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Review: Once Upon A Road Trip by Angela N. Blount

Title: Once Upon A Road Trip
Author: Angela N. Blount
Format: Ebook
Publisher: Artifice Press
Publish Date: July 30, 2013
Source: I received a copy from the author; however, this did not affect my review.


Why You're Reading This Book:
  • You're a memoir fan
What's the Story?:

From Goodreads.com: "Eighteen-year-old Angeli doesn’t "fit in." She’s never been on a single date, and she lives vicariously through an online world of storytelling. With the pressures of choosing a practical future path bearing down, she needs a drastic change. Too old to run away from home, she opts instead to embark on a solo 2-month road trip. But her freedom is tempered by loneliness — and anxiety tests her resolve as she comes face-to-face with her quirky internet friends.

Aside from contracting mono and repeatedly getting herself lost, Angeli's adventure is mired by more unforeseen glitches — like being detained by Canadian authorities, and a near-death experience at the hands of an overzealous amateur wrestler. Her odyssey is complicated further when she unwittingly earns the affections of two young men. One a privileged martial artist; the other a talented techie with a colorful past.

Bewildered by the emotions they stir, Angeli spurns the idea of a doomed long-distance relationship. But she is unprepared for the determination of her hopeful suitors. In the wake of her refusal, one man will betray her, and the other will prove himself worthy of a place in her future."


My Two Cents:

 "Once Upon a Road Trip" is a non-fictional story of Angeli (told in third person point of view interestingly enough), who goes on a road trip to meet her internet friends. The fact that it was based on the author's own experiences added an extra layer of interest for me.

I really thought this book was interesting. I've always dreamed of going on a cross country road trip (even though I really don't care for driving) so I liked living vicariously through Angeli's trip in this book. I did like the story but it seemed like it took awhile to get to the real arc of the story. The arc of the story involved Angeli and two of her internet friends that she meets both falling for Angeli. There was a lot about Angeli's road trip prior to these two guys fighting over her. While I enjoyed "meeting" the people that she met through her road trip but in the end, it sort of distracted from the overall point.

I did like the writing in this book. The author definitely has a way of making conversations seem really real. Because the conversations felt so real, it pulled me into the book. I think that conversations can be one of the most difficult things to capture in the book. There were a lot of characters in this book but I thought the author did a pretty good job of giving them each a separate "voice."

Overall, I liked this story.


 

Review: The World Atlas of Street Art and Graffiti by Rafael Schacter

Title: The World Atlas of Street Art and Graffiti
Author: Rafael Schacter
Format: Hardcover
Publisher: Yale University Press
Publish Date: September 3, 2013
Source: I received a copy from the publisher; however, this did not affect my review.






Why You're Reading This Book:

  • You're a non-fiction fan.
  • You're an art fan.
What's the Story?:

From Goodreads.com: "Painted murals first appeared in Latin America in the early 20th century; in the 1950s, spray-can graffiti associated with Latino gangs followed, notably the "cholo” graffiti of Los Angeles. Today, street art has traveled to nearly every corner of the globe, evolving into a highly complex and ornate art form. The World Atlas of Street Art and Graffiti is the definitive survey of international street art, focusing on the world’s most influential urban artists and artworks. Since the lives and works of urban artists are inextricably linked to specific streets and places, this beautifully illustrated volume features specially commissioned "city artworks” that provide an intimate understanding of these metropolitan landscapes."




My Two Cents:


Graffiti is a divisive topic. Some people believe that it's a public nuisance. Some believe that it's truly art. I think it's absolutely fascinating either way you look at it.

This book is a encyclopedia of very different artists divided up by where in the world they are located. I loved that the book was divided up by city. It was interesting to see how the place where the artists were located seemed to influence their work and in some cases, even each other! Through the street art and graffiti of each different locale, you really get a sense of the city.

This is an absolutely gorgeous book filled with fantastic pictures. I loved looking through this book and reading the back stories and histories of the artists and the places where they make their art. This book is going to make a fantastic addition to my library (this is a book that I will definitely look at in the future). It would make a great gift for your loved ones that enjoy art!

Overall, this is a great collection.


 

Monday, October 21, 2013

Review: Hiding from Myself by Bryan Christopher

Title: Hiding from Myself
Author: Bryan Christopher
Format: Ebook
Publisher: Self-published
Publish Date: October 11, 2013
Source: I received a copy from the author; however, this did not affect my review.






Why You're Reading This Book:

  • You're a memoir fan.
  • You don't mind tough subjects.
What's the Story?:

From Goodreads.com: "A “pray away the gay” memoir that opens in Hugh Hefner’s closet?

Consider this: it’s timely and relevant and there’s not another book out there that tackles the thorny issue of homosexuality and fundamentalist Christianity that includes Hugh Hefner, naked sorority girls and Jesus Christ!

From the issue of “gay marriage” boiling in the cauldron of politics and religion, to bullied gay teens tragically taking their own lives, to churches splitting right down the middle over gay clergy you can’t turn on the TV or pick up a newspaper without seeing “gay” in a headline.

Few cultural issues ignite such passion from all sides. For those in the church that see homosexuality as “immoral” and a “sin,” the notion of “gay marriage” is intolerable. For those who are gay, being demonized and shamed by the church is simply intolerant.

Bryan Christopher’s life has been spent straddling this great divide.

As a boy raised under the blinding Friday Night Lights of the Bible belt of Texas in the ‘70s and ‘80s—from the playground to the pulpit—one message was clear: “queers” deserved to be smeared.

And at the dawn of puberty, he knew he was in trouble: he was staring limply at the pages of his dad’s Playboy!

That’s when the hiding began. And in his neck of the woods, it left him with one option: change!"


My Two Cents:

"Hiding from Myself" is the story of one man who has never been comfortable in his own shoes. He grew up in a fairly conservative family (at least as he perceived it). When he begins feeling feelings for other men, he tries to push it down. He throws himself into things like bible study, listening to anti- and ex- gay meant to help convert people to heterosexuality tapes in the car and trying to sell others on religion, thinking that he could literally "pray the gay away." Eventually he realizes that there is way more to life that simply hiding who he really is!

In this very honest, very raw memoir, author Bryan Christopher recounts his struggle with himself. I really liked this memoir that tackles a serious subject with a sense of humor. I'm not sure I've come across another book that tackles the subject of someone trying to hide that they are gay and trying to become an ex-gay. This book made me very sad. I think it's important to know about all sorts of different people in this world so that we can be more understanding and caring for those around us who are going through a difficult time.

Yes, this is a serious subject. Yes, this is a tough subject. But I appreciated how Mr. Christopher was able to write in such a way to allow us to see that he still seemed to have a good sense of humor about it, which really helps readers feel for Mr. Christopher's plight. There are actually some very funny parts in this book. The way that Christopher writes really pulled me into the story!

Overall, this is a great memoir!


 

Review: The Art of British Rock by Mike Evans and Paul Palmer-Edwards

Title: The Art of British Rock: 50 Years Of Rock Posters, Flyers And Handbills
Authors: Mike Evans and Paul Palmer-Edwards
Format: Paperback
Publisher: Frances Lincoln
Publish Date: August 15, 2013
Source: I received a copy from the publisher; however, this did not affect my review.


Why You're Reading This Book:
  • You're an art fan.
  • You're a music fan.
What's the Story?:

From Goodreads.com: "Celebrating a half century of design in posters, flyers and advertising ephemera, The Art of British Rock highlights the UK’s distinct contribution to rock’n’roll graphics. From custom designed posters for provincial ballrooms in the late 50s to the computer-generated images of today, rock music illustration has reflected – and influenced – crucial changes in popular visual art. With classic examples (some unseen for many years) of key styles including pop art, psychedelic illustration, punk 'do-it-yourself' and digital imaging, the book documents the stunning visual style of British rock from the era of the Beatles and Rolling Stones to the present-day art of indie guitar bands, cutting edge soloists and contemporary clubland.

Arranged chronologically, The Art of British Rock features more than 350 posters ranging from the work of anonymous artists to internationally acclaimed designers including the Hapshash group in the 60s, Hipgnosis and Barney Bubbles in the 70s, and Malcolm Garrett, Peter Saville and Vaughan Oliver in the 80s and beyond. All are the subject of special features within each chapter. Concluding with the mix of retro and state-of-the-art design that has characterized rock poster illustration in the first decade of the 21st century, this is a unique account of more than 50 years of British rock’n’roll art."


My Two Cents:

Art and music: are there any two things that go together better? This book explores British Rock (one of my personal faves) specifically from about the 1960s to almost present day with a heavy focus on the 60s and 70s. It's a really pretty book, filled with a lot of great pictures. There are also really interesting back stories about some of the artists behind some of the iconic music art. I liked being able to see how some of the art came about. I also thought it was cool to learn how some of the same artists created a whole bunch of really amazing art for various artists. A lot of it was new information

I've always been fascinated by the art of music. I found this collection really interesting. I really liked how the book was broken down by different genres and kinds of art. Some of it is truly amazing. Bands like the Beatles (especially in their later, more experimental years) are linked with their album art or concert poster art. Just think of the cover of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club. If you're a fan of the Beatles, it probably comes to mind right away.

This book would make a fantastic gift for the art or music lover in your life!


  

Friday, October 18, 2013

HF Virtual Book Tours Review: Elaine Cougler, Author of The Loyalist's Wife

Today I am happy to welcome Elaine Cougler, author of The Loyalist's Wife, here to A Bookish Affair.


Guest posting today for Meg is a distinct pleasure for me and my thanks go out to her. Since Halloween is coming soon the topic I came up with links to the season but I must stress The Loyalist’s Wife is not about Halloween!


Ghosts, Spooks, and Bumps in the Night: What Role Do They Play in Historical Fiction?
I write historical fiction, not horror, or even paranormal but a few strange bits find their way into my work. Sometimes things do go bump in the night, as we all know, and a writer loves to make the most of them.
My Lucy is left alone on their isolated farm in New York State while John goes off to fight for Butler’s Rangers and the King. Milking the cow, scattering seeds for the squabbling chickens and strutting rooster, and hoeing the planted corn field are just some of the tasks which fill her days so that she barely has time to eat. For the most part she has no time to think and worry but when she pauses in the corn field, leans on the hoe, and studies the trees behind the cabin, she feels eyes on her but sees nothing. Nothing but the wind rustling the leaves. Molly’s lowing calls her back to finish her hoeing before heading for the milk pail.
There is nothing and no one there, she tells herself.
And yet, when she wakes alone in the night, the floor creaks and she sits right up in bed. She hears the door latch. Is it someone trying to get in or just her ears playing tricks on her?
Of course these words create suspense and keep readers wanting to know more. Even though my writing is about a fictional young couple and their life set against the historical events of the American Revolutionary War, I still use our natural fear of the unknown to increase tension in the story.
The Loyalist’s Wife:
When American colonists resort to war against Britain and her colonial attitudes, a young couple caught in the crossfire must find a way to survive. Pioneers in the wilds of New York State, John and Lucy face a bitter separation and the fear of losing everything, even their lives, when he joins Butler’s Rangers to fight for the King and leaves her to care for their isolated farm. As the war in the Americas ramps up, ruffians roam the colonies looking to snap up Loyalist land. Alone, pregnant, and fearing John is dead, Lucy must fight with every weapon she has.
With vivid scenes of desperation, heroism, and personal angst, Elaine Cougler takes us back to the beginnings of one great country and the planting of Loyalist seeds for another. The Loyalist’s Wife transcends the fighting between nations to show us the individual cost of such battles.

Elaine blogs at On Becoming a Wordsmith which may be found at www.elainecougler.com. She also is frequently found here: @ElaineCougler, Facebook/ElaineCouglerAuthor, and LinkedIn author groups. The Loyalist’s Wife is available on Amazon and Kobo. www.amazon.com  www.kobo.com

Follow the Rest of the Tour:

Monday, October 7
Feature & Giveaway at Passages to the Past
Tuesday, October 8
Review at West Metro Mommy
Wednesday, October 9
Review at Sharon’s Garden of Book Reviews
Thursday, October 10
Review at Unabridged Chick
Review & Giveaway at Flashlight Commentary
Friday, October 11
Review & Giveaway at Kinx’s Book Nook
Monday, October 14
Review at Book Lovers Paradise
Tuesday, October 15
Review at A Bookish Affair
Guest Post at Book Lovers Paradise
Thursday, October 17
Review at Oh, for the Hook of a Book!
Review at So Many Books, So Little Time
Friday, October 18
Review & Giveaway at Peeking Between the Pages
Guest Post at A Bookish Affair
Interview at Oh, for the Hook of a Book!
Monday, October 21
Review & Giveaway at Confessions of an Avid Reader
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Thursday, October 17, 2013

Giveaway Winners!

I have two giveaway winners to announce today!


The Shogun's Daughter:
Terry M.

The Nine Fold Heaven:
Marie S.

HF Virtual Book Tours Guest Post and Giveaway: David Blixt, Author of Colossus

Today, I'm happy to welcome David Blixt, author of Colossus: The Four Emperors here to A Bookish Affair.





Senatus Populaesque Romanum
I should be using this chance to shill for my new book, The Four Emperors. And this essay is certainly inspired by it – or rather, by fear that it will happen again.
Watching the shenanigans in the US House of Representatives, I can’t help but think of Rome. After two novels, a play, and two more novels next year, I may have Rome on the brain. But it’s getting harder and harder to ignore the terrifying parallels, all coming faster and faster. It took the Romans nearly 500 years to get to where we are in just over 200.
Our most dire peril, as I see it, is the breakdown of the rule of Law. When our lawmakers dislike the laws that came before them, and decide to subvert them, the whole system is endangered.
The greatest gift the Romans gave us wasn’t aqueducts or amphitheatres, or even art. It was Law. The Roman court system was the envy of the world. Yes, there were miscarriages of justice, when a jury was bribed or a judge threw out an air-tight case. But even the very concept of standing courts was new to the world, as was a selected jury of your peers (rather than the unwieldy Greek version of a court, when the whole city came together to pass judgment. The Roman way didn’t shut down the society).
At the dawn of the Republic, when the first Brutus threw out the Tarquin and set up a new system of government, there were four inalienable rights of citizenship:
1 – A Roman had the right to vote. After the overthrowing of a tyrannical king, this was a huge guarantee, and vital.
2 – A Roman had the right to own property.
3- A Roman had the right to marry. This was later expanded to include all legal contracts – basically a Roman had the right to sign a written contract, or enter a verbal one, and expect it to be upheld.
4 – A Roman had the right to be whole in his person. Technically this means he could be beaten with a rod, but not whipped or cut – nothing that broke the skin. But it also had the effect that he had recourse at law for any injustice or indult given him – assault, etc. This also ended up guaranteeing a citizen the right to a trial before he was punished. The right to a fair trial is enormously important.
Having come from tyranny, these rights were precious, and ferociously defended, becoming the cornerstones of Roman law (and of course I should mention that these applied to Roman male citizens. Women eventually could own property, but the rest of their rights were not nearly as protected. A man could divorce a woman on a whim, whereas a woman needed a reason, and proof).
These foundations got expanded over time, as rights do. First conceived to protect Patricians (the “fathers” of the country), they then spread to cover all citizens, even Plebians. As more and more people got the citizenship, and therefore the vote, the ideal of Roman law was respected the world over. People from other countries would travel to Rome to get justice in a Roman court. A will lodged with the Vestal Virgins in Rome was considered so safe than many foreign kings placed their wills in those holy hands. Roman justice was seen to be swift, and by-and-large fair.
What eventually happened, though, was that the lawmakers started to not like the eroding of what they saw as their rights. There were too many “new men” coming up to join their ranks (some were even of Italian, not Roman, birth!) In response, lawmakers began rigging the elections, so that their votes counted more than those of ordinary people. Then they started holding themselves exempt from certain laws. Then they started passing laws to circumvent other laws. Then Cicero had five Roman citizens executed without a trial.
For all our talk of Caesar crossing the Rubicon, it was this undermining of the law that was the beginning of the end for the Republic. A country’s laws are only useful when they are seen as applying equally to all people, high or low. I know I’m supposed to be promoting The Four Emperors, but I’m going to quote from the next book I have coming out, also set in Rome. It’s a play called Eve Of Ides, and it’s set the night before the assassination of Caesar:
CAESAR
The law is a breathing thing, Brutus. It cannot be static. When the Senate - a few hundred men of birth and wealth, making laws for people they despise - when they make laws that go against the wishes or interests of the people, they abrogate their authority.


BRUTUS
Is that how you see the Senate?


CAESAR
(laughing) I’ve been a member too long to see it as anything other than what it is - a collection of privileged fools who do nothing and obstruct everything. They’ll fight even the most basic, clear-headed notion because it was suggested by their political enemy. As if we were not all Romans. Picking absurd fights to protect some petty private interests, backing so deep into a political corner that my only viable solution is military. Lawmakers with a profound disdain for the law. That is how I see the Senate. Whereas you see it as you wish it to be - a just and wise body of men.


BRUTUS
The dreamer.


CAESAR
And the pragmatist.


This was a very reasonable view of the Senate in Caesar’s day. They routinely broke the law, violating their stated beliefs in order to protect their power and privileges, invoking Rome’s founders and traditions as a club to beat anyone who disagreed with them.
Does this sound at all familiar?
We must study Rome, not for simple love of history. Our own founders consciously based the government they created on the Roman system – two houses, a Senate and a House of Plebs; two consuls to run the executive branch; and a system of standing courts. With Rome as our model, it is imperative that we learn from Rome’s mistakes, not repeat them. Otherwise we’ll end up with too much power vested in the executive branch, a huge income disparity between the wealthy and the common man, and a military engaged in perpetual war.
Oh wait…
As I see it, we’re in the time of Gaius Gracchus. Gracchus, who tried to advocate for the rights of the common man above the elite. When he was opposed by a faction of backward-looking zealots calling themselves the Boni (the “Good Men”), who pulled the same parliamentary tricks as the Tea Party this last fortnight, Grachus said, “A tribune who diminishes the privileges of the people ceases to be a tribune of the people.” I couldn’t agree more.
Being in the time of Gracchus means we’re not doomed yet. But if Rome is a reliable roadmap, in about 100 years we’re destined for our own Nero, our own Galba, Otho, Vitellius, our own Year of the Four Emperors. That year, 69 AD, was a nightmare of unconstitutionality. But by then, the constitution of Rome was so badly trampled that it was virtually useless.
When law-makers live outside the law, the law ceases to have value. As Truman Capote said, “The problem with living outside the law is that you no longer have the protection of it.”
By the bye, I don’t have a soapbox in The Four Emperors. It’s just my attempt to tell an excellent and exciting story, a story worth telling. But history is more than a window into the past. History is a mirror, a window into ourselves. As I said in an interview last week, “We forget our history. That’s what literature can do – remind us not of where we are, but how we got here.”
Senatus Populaesque Romanum: “The Senate and People of Rome.” We forget the People at our peril. The same is true of history.
I’ll close with a lengthy exchange from the end of Act One of Eve Of Ides:
CAESAR
You of all men might understand. Seven civil wars in my lifetime. Seven. Add to that proscriptions, purges, and outright murder, and what do you have? Chaos. Rome is foundering. You must see that. Our customs and beliefs are dashing themselves against the facts of our times. The ideals of our founders are either ill-equipped for modern man, or else ill-served by him. The poor are frightened by the change, and they cling to the three staples of their lives - their gods, their games, and their bread. The Second and Third Classes want to join the First Class while the First Class wants to protect its exclusivity. We with the birth, the money, and the will to govern are expected - needed - to provide for the lesser among us. Else the Republic will fall.


BRUTUS
The Republic is eternal.


CAESAR
Nothing is eternal. Not even the gods. Without a firm hand, we will return to Pandora’s world - a world of chaos. It’s almost as though someone has defied the gods and shouted out Roma’s secret name into the open air, heralding our destruction.


BRUTUS
Is that the choice? Caesar, or chaos?


CAESAR
Not a palatable choice, I’ll confess. But you must see that a dictator is better than destruction.


BRUTUS
I’m not so sure. We cannot have a king - or a Caesar - and still be the people our forefathers envisioned.


CAESAR
But they couldn’t envision the state in which we find ourselves today! We’re no longer that tiny colony on the seven hills, desperate to survive the wolves. We have interests in foreign lands, far-flung peoples and places. Our wealth is great, our prestige greater, our enemies greater still. The sign-posts our ancestors planted should guide us to who we will become, not bind us to who we were. An example - from the time of our founding until a generation ago, the poor had no stake in the society. The army was filled with men of means - men with property have property to defend. But that changed when Marius saw Rome’s need for soldiers - an honest need, with the Germans coming for us like an avalanche. Lacking men, he drafted the poor. Practical. But fifty years on, what do we have? Professional soldiers coming home to find themselves rejoining the poor, wondering why they were called to fight for their country. Was it to join the Head Count and starve once discharged? Military training married to starvation births revolution. And not one of our civil civil wars, with Senators battling Senators. This will be a genuine uprising, with the people overthrowing the lot of us. As a consequence, Rome today needs wars, constant wars, foreign wars, until we are prosperous and equitable here at home. Without wars abroad, we sow the seeds of our own destruction here at home.


BRUTUS
Perpetual warfare? That’s a terrible solution!


CAESAR
Offer an alternative. Should we tax businesses? The poor? Women? That is the choice - wars of conquest, or taxation. War is both popular and profitable. We can try to replace it with arena games, but nothing matches the patriotic fervor of war, nor its ability to produce funds.


BRUTUS
We should just return to the old ways. Leave the rest of the world to fight each other. Remain above it.


CAESAR
We tried! We tried, but they came for us anyway! Carthage, Pontus, the Germans - we fought them and fought them until we saw the only way to keep them at bay was to conquer them. I am not saying I approve, Brutus. I’m saying this is where we are.


BRUTUS
Are we a nation of brigands, then? Foreign wars are theft writ large.


CAESAR
Whereas civil wars are not about wealth or land. They’re about our idea of ourselves. Most men are sadly incapable of defining themselves by what they are, so they rely on what they are not. Being Roman has to mean more than merely not being Greek or Aegyptian. If we cannot have a foreign foe to define us, we will create one within our own ranks. And the sides will forever line up between youth and learning on the one hand and tradition and dogged ignorance on the other. One side sees the need for change, while the other sees the passing of the old ways and resists.


BRUTUS
No illusion to which side you favor in that struggle.


CAESAR
There is value to our history, but it cannot dictate our future.


BRUTUS
Says the Dictator.
CAESAR
Says Caesar.

Giveaway:

Fill out the form below for a chance to win a copy of Colossus: The Four Emperors (open internationally).


a Rafflecopter giveaway

Follow the Rest of the Tour:

Monday, October 7
Review at Confessions of an Avid Reader
Tuesday, October 8
Review at Reading the Ages
Interview at Confessions of an Avid Reader
Wednesday, October 9
Guest Post at Historical Tapestry
Thursday, October 10
Review at Historical Tapestry & The Adventures of an Intrepid Reader
Friday, October 11
Review & Interview at Oh, For the Hook of a Book!
Guest Post at Bibliophilic Book Blog
Monday, October 14
Review at Just One More Chapter
Tuesday, October 15
Review at WTF Are You Reading?
Wednesday, October 16
Review at A Bookish Affair
Review & Giveaway at Closed the Cover
Thursday, October 17
Guest Post & Giveaway at A Bookish Affair
Friday, October 18
Review at The Musings of a Book Junkie
Monday, October 21
Review & Giveaway at The True Book Addict
Tuesday, October 22
Review & Giveaway at Broken Teepee
Wednesday, October 23
Review at Dee’s Reads
Guest Post & Giveaway at HF Connection
Thursday, October 24
Review at She Reads Novels
Friday, October 25
Review at A Book Geek
Review & Giveaway at The Most Happy Reader
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