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Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Review: Under the Same Sky by Genevieve Graham

Title: Under the Same Sky
Author: Genevieve Graham
Publisher: Berkley Trade
Publish Date: January 3, 2012
Source: I received a copy from the author and publisher. This did not affect my review.



Why You're Reading This Book?:
  • You're a historical fiction fan.
  • You like great, well developed characters.
What's the Story?:

From Goodreads.com: "The year is 1746. A young woman from South Carolina and a Scottish Highlander share an intimacy and devotion beyond their understanding. They have had visions of each other their entire lives. And yet they have never met.
Now, with their lives torn asunder, Maggie Johnson and Andrew MacDonnell's quest to find each other is guided only by their dreams—and by the belief in the true love they share.

On the Carolina frontier Maggie Johnson’s family struggles to survive. Maggie’s gift of “the sight” and her visions show her a presence she calls Wolf. She watches him grow from a boy her age to a man even as she goes from child to woman.

Andrew MacDonald has always wondered about the girl he sees in his dreams. He is able to talk to her through their thoughts and vows that even if he must cross an ocean he will find her. They are thrust into different situations: Andrew fights for the doomed Jacobite cause and Maggie is captured by slavers, then rescued and brought into a kind, loving Native American tribe. They each believe in destiny and the power of the love they have shared forever."


My Two Cents:

Oh, I really liked this book! It's a historical fiction mixed with some mystery and paranormal with some romance or in other words, a truly delicious combination and the type of book that you can get lost in. And lost I got. This book found me lazing on the couch for the entire afternoon because I couldn't bear to put it down. I really liked how the author wove the paranormal details with the historical details. It really made the book come to life for me!

This is also a tale of how you shouldn't judge a book by its cover. I saw the cover before reading the synopsis and said "oh, this is a bodice ripper." And I like bodice rippers sometimes but this book is not a bodice ripper at all. There is romance but not the... uh... sort that you would be expecting from the cover.

This book explores the idea of soulmates, an idea that I really like. I loved Maggie and Andrew as soulmates. I loved that both of them seemed to know each other even though they were literally an ocean apart (Maggie is in the Carolinas and Andrew is a Scottish Highlander).

I really wish that we would have gotten to see more about them once they finally meet in real life. I'm still holding out hope for a sequel that features more of Andrew and Maggie together (Graham has another book coming out later this spring that features Andrew's brother back in Scotland; there's a sneak peek in the back of Under the Same Sky). I think one of the signs of a good book is when you aren't ready to let go of the characters at the end of the book and I was so not ready to let go!

Bottom line: This is a story that will hold on to you until the last page (and beyond).


  

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Historical Fiction Tour Stop: Guest Post by M.J. Rose






Today, I'm excited to have M.J. Rose, author of The Book of Lost Fragrances (which I reviewed last week) to A Bookish Affair to talk about a classic fragrance.



M.J. Rose: I've been fascinated with lost fragrances since long before I started writing The
Book of Lost Fragrances... since I found a bottle of perfume on my great grandmother's dresser
that had belonged to her mother in Russia. Here is one of those lost fragrances that stirs the
senses and the imagination... (researched and described with the help of the perfume writer
Dimitrios Dimitriadis)

GUERLAIN - EAU DE VERVEINE

Guerlain first focused on verveine (verbena) varieties to use in perfumes in the mid-late 1800's.
Eau de Verveine was released first in the 1870's and made brief reappearances in the 1950s
and the 1980s before being retired from Guerlain's perfume portfolio. Eau de Verveine is the
scent of high summer… sharp, uplifting notes of citrus-green lemon verbena flood the mouth
with saliva with their crisp, energizing aroma. Below is a prickle of something darker - perhaps
carnation or clove - which adds incredible depth. There is a dry, tea-like quality that emerges
as the scent dries on the skin. This impossibly rare scent evokes feelings of long days at the
summer's end with the chirrup of cicadas ringing in the ears.





Note from Meg: Sounds like summer to me!


Don't Forget to Follow the Rest of the Tour:


Monday, February 20th
Review at Attack the Stacks
Guest Post at From the TBR Pile

Tuesday, February 21st
Review at By the By Books

Wednesday, February 22nd
Review at Reading the Past
Guest Post at Savvy Verse & Wit
Thursday, February 23rd
Review at A Bookish Affair
Review at Elle Lit
Guest Post at The Literate Housewife
Guest Post at Love of Books

Friday, February 24th
Review at From the TBR Pile
Monday, February 27th
Review at The Bookworm
Guest Post at Elle Lit
Guest Post at By the By Books

Tuesday, February 28th
Review & Guest Post at The Book Faery Reviews
Guest Post at A Bookish Affair

Wednesday, February 29th
Guest Post at Let Them Read Books
Thursday, March 1st
Review at A Novel Source
Guest Post at A Chick Who Reads

Friday, March 2nd
Guest Post at The True Book Addict

Monday, March 5th
Review at Workaday Reads
Guest Post at Reviews by Molly

Tuesday, March 6th
Review at The Book Garden
Author Interview at A Novel Source

Wednesday, March 7th
Review at Books Devoured
Review at Misfit Salon
Guest Post at Literary Marie

Thursday, March 8th
Guest Post at Workaday Reads
Guest Post at Mrs. Q Book Addict

Friday, March 9th
Review at Reviews by Molly

Monday, March 12th
Guest Post at Books Devoured

Tuesday, March 13th
Guest Post at Bippity Boppity Book

Wednesday, March 14th
Guest Post at Life in the Thumb
Guest Post at Book Fan Mary

Thursday, March 15th
Review at My Reading Room
Review at Man of La Book

Friday, March 16th
Guest Post at Daisy's Book Journal
Guest Post at To Read or Not to Read

Monday, March 19th
Review at Broken Teepee
Guest Post at Debbie's Book Bag

Tuesday, March 20th
Guest Post at My Reading Room

Wednesday, March 21st
Review at Unabridged Chick
Review at Love of Books
Guest Post at The Owl Bookmark Blog
Guest Post at Under the Boardwalk

Thursday, March 22nd
Guest Post at Man of La Book

Friday, March 23rd

Guest Post at Broken Teepee
Author Interview at Unabridged Chick

Monday, March 26th
Review at Booksessed
Review at Ravishing Reads

Tuesday, March 27th
Review at The Paris Blog
Guest Post at Girls just Reading
Guest Post at Kelsey's Book Corner

Wednesday, March 28th
Review at My Bookshelf
Guest Post at vvb32 Reads
Guest Post at CMash Loves to Read

Thursday, March 29th
Review at Ravishing Reads
Guest Post at Books and Needlepoint

Friday, March 30th
Review at vvb32 Reads
Guest Post at My Bookshelf

Monday, April 2nd
Review at Book Den
Guest Post at Diary of an Eccentric

Tuesday, April 3rd

Wednesday, April 4th
Guest Post at Book Den

Thursday, April 5th
Review at Bellas Novella
Review at Drey's Library
Guest Post at Layers of Thought
Guest Post at Alexa Loves Books

Literary Locale: Odessa, Ukraine, Part Two






Today, I'm taking you back to Odessa, Ukraine, the city that Catherine the Great (who was featured in The Winter Palace) built. Part one of Literary Locale: Odessa can be found here.

Another very European part of Odessa: a grand promenade.


Here's another picture of the Catherine the Great statue. These guys around the base of the statues were all her lovers at some point. Scandalous!

One of the main parks in Odessa. A lovely place for a walk.

One of the gorgeous Orthodox churches. Those onion domes are unreal in real life!

At the top of the Ptolekin steps with a fantastic view of the Hotel Odessa, a very fancy hotel, and the Black Sea.

Where are you reading? Feel free to grab the logo and play along. Don't forget to leave a link to your blog so I can come visit.

Monday, February 27, 2012

It's Monday, What Are You Reading?: The It's Been Awhile Edition



Oh boy, it's been awhile since I've participated in It's Monday, What Are You Reading? or really any meme except for Literary Locale. Things have been really, really crazy with work and life and such.

Just Read: 

Looks like a bodice ripper of sorts. Totally not and totally awesome.


Currently Reading:

Loving this one so much!

Next Up:



What are you reading?

Review: Anything is Possible by Thomas Bahler

Title: Anything is Possible
Author: Thomas Bahler
Publisher: Self-published
Publish Date: May 30, 2011
Source: I received a copy from the PR. This did not affect my review.


Why You're Reading This Book:
  • You're a historical fiction fan.
What's the Story?:

From the Author's website: "Thomas Bähler has just released his first novel, Anything is Possible .  This inspiring and heartwarming story follows the life of Æsop.  For centuries the world has studied Æsop’s Fables.  Whether you’ve read The Tortoise and the Hare, The Lion and the Mouse, The Goose Who Laid the Golden Eggs or so many others, we have all enjoyed the magic of his words.  But it may come as a surprise to learn that Æsop was, for much of his life, a slave.  A beautiful, richly wrought story, it re-imagines the life of the great storyteller, Æsop.  Born a slave in the house of Theseus, Æsop understands early on that though the world may see him as a slave, in his heart he is free.

Through countless hardships, cruel masters and the loss of everything he loves, Æsop holds fast to those immortal words his mother taught him and finally finds a way to achieve his dreams of Freedom.  So rarely does a story like this cross our paths, with such a perfect message for these difficult times.  Powerful though simple, it is a profoundly inspirational tale that teaches us that ... Anything is Possible."

What's the Story?: 

Most people are familiar with Aesop's fables. I know that some of his stories were some of the most beloved of my childhood. They were some of the first ways that I learned life lessons that I still carry with me and think about today. There's a good reason that his stories are still so well-known and loved.

I can't say that I ever thought much about Aesop as a person. I never really separated the man from the stories and really I did not know much about his life at all. I've said before that I love how historical fiction can introduce you to people and at least give you a little bit of a flavor for a historical figure that you may be familiar with.

Bahler spins a great story about Aesop growing up as a slave in Greece. It's a station in life that is incredibly hard to rise above but if anyone can, it's Aesop! Through his personal philosophy of "anything is possible," he's able to do a lot of amazing things.

In a lot of ways, this book itself feels like a fable of sorts. By definition, a fable is a short story used to teach a lesson usually with animals or inanimate objects. While this story doesn't involve animal characters, it does have a message with an undeniable force of nature behind it.

Bottom line: This is a great story that introduces who Aesop really was to the rest of the world and will be loved by historical fiction fans.



Sunday, February 26, 2012

Review: Tris and Izzie by Mette Ivie Harrison

Title: Tris and Izzie
Author: Mette Ivie Harrison
Publisher: Egmont
Publish Date: October 11, 2011
Source: Netgalley


Why You're Reading This Book:
  • You're a young adult fiction fan.
What's the Story?:

From Goodreads.com: "A modern retelling of the German fairytale "Tristan and Isolde", Tris and Izzie is about a young witch named Izzie who is dating Mark King, the captain of the basketball team and thinks her life is going swimmingly well. Until -- she makes a love potion for her best friend Brangane and then ends up taking it herself accidentally, and falling in love with Tristan, the new guy at school."

My Two Cents:

This book is a retelling of the Wagner opera Tristan and Isolde with a paranormal twist. It definitely sounded like an interesting premise but the execution was not great. I really do love retelling of classic stories but I like when the story blends into whatever is the new time period is. With this story, it just seems like it was plopped into modern times with no real adaptation. The names have been modernized a little bit but not much, which sort of takes you out of the world of the book.

The paranormal element of the book really has to do with the different powers that some of the characters have. Izzie's mother is a witch who can make magic potions for a variety of maladies. Izzie steals a love potion meaning to get her best friend, Branna, together with the guy of her dreams. But instead she and Tristan, the new guy at school, inexplicably drink it instead and fall in love, which is sort of strange. The magic is sort of sprung on you and isn't really woven into the story at all.

Also, none of the characters are really likeable. Izzie is sort of naive and doesn't seem to care that her best friend, Brenna, seems to really hate her. Tristan is just a little strange. Not long after she gives Tristan the potion, she's trying to figure out ways to get rid of him, which is also very strange.

This book was just not my cup of tea.


 

Saturday, February 25, 2012

Congratulations!: The Turning of Anne Merrick and Stationary Bundle






The winner of the copy of The Turning of Anne Merrick is:
CarloSchmarlo

The winner of the 18th century stationary bundle is:
Lilian

Both of the winners should have received an email from me by now. They have 48 hours to respond.

Review: A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway

Title: A Moveable Feast
Author: Ernest Hemingway
Publisher: The publisher of the copy I read was Scribner (Restored Edition)
Publish Date: Originally 1963
Source: Library



Why You're Reading This Book:
  • You're a classics lover.
  • You're an armchair traveler.
What's the Story?:

From Goodreads.com: "Published posthumously in 1964, A Moveable Feast remains one of Ernest Hemingway's most beloved works. It is his classic memoir of Paris in the 1920s, filled with irreverent portraits of other expatriate luminaries such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein; tender memories of his first wife, Hadley; and insightful recollections of his own early experiments with his craft. It is a literary feast, brilliantly evoking the exuberant mood of Paris after World War I and the youthful spirit, unbridled creativity, and unquenchable enthusiasm that Hemingway himself epitomized."

My Two Cents:

Ah early 20th century Paris! Land of cafes and writers. Can you imagine having a drink in a cafe while sitting across the table from Ernest Hemingway or F. Scott Fitzgerald while discussing their latest work? A Movable Feast gives you the chance to do just that. Hemingway takes us to glamorous Paris where the writing elite of the time have all descended to fine tune their craft. This book is so awesome. It's sort of a who's who of the cafe culture of Paris during the 1920s, a time period that I'm absolutely in love with.

This is really my first experience with Hemingway and as far as I know, this is one of his only non-fiction books. Even from this book with his friends and familiars as his focus, you can see why he's still so beloved by readers today.

Probably my favorite parts of the books were the parts about Hemingway's family and also F. Scott Fitzgerald and his family. This book is rare as it isn't too often that you get to hear first hand information about people that I really admire like this.

What I can say is that this book definitely whet my appetite to read more Hemingway.


Friday, February 24, 2012

Romance at Random Book Tour Stop and Give@way: Ride With Me by Ruthie Knox

Title: Ride With Me
Author: Ruthie Knox
Publisher: Loveswept
Publish Date: February 13, 2012
Source: Romance at Random






Why You're Reading This Book:

  • You're a fiction fan.
  • You love a good, steamy romance.
What's the Story?:

From Goodreads.com: "When Lexie Marshall places an ad for a cycling companion, she hopes to find someone friendly and fun to cross the TransAmerica Trail with. Instead, she gets Tom Geiger—a lean, sexy loner whose bad attitude threatens to spoil the adventure she’s spent years planning.

Roped into the cycling equivalent of a blind date by his sister, Tom doesn’t want to ride with a chatty, go-by-the-map kind of woman, and he certainly doesn’t want to want her. Too bad the sight of Lexie with a bike between her thighs really turns his crank.

Even Tom’s stubborn determination to keep Lexie at a distance can’t stop a kiss from leading to endless nights of hotter-than-hot sex. But when the wild ride ends, where will they go next?"


My Two Cents:

Sometimes you just want to sink into a book with a great, steamy romantic story and some great characters. This book totally fits the bill. Lexie wants to spend a couple months riding a bike on the TransAm trail, a cross-country trail. It doesn't seem to fit in with her usual persona: a relatively staid schoolteacher who doesn't like to take a lot of risks and likes to follow the rules exactly (a girl after my own heart really). Riding the TransAm trail that goes from Oregon all the way to Virginia would be a grueling and very lonely trip for anyone but would it be more bearable with a partner? Lexie isn't necessarily forward when she advertises for a riding companion but will the end justify the means? In this case, its a resounding yes.

Enter Tom. He's a little rough and definitely someone that Lexie has to work a little on to crack. And he is exactly the kind of romantic hero I like. He's strong. There's way more to him that meets the eye. I love that Lexie has to kind of work a little bit to figure out what his story is, why he's so offstand-ish, and what he might be hiding from her. I think through that whole process, you really get to find out a lot about the characters and they become more 3D. I think that a lot of times that flat characters are a real issue in a romance. This is definitely not the case here! And on top of it all, Tom's dreaminess factor is definitely high. The steam factor is even higher.


Bottom line: This is a great romance with great characters to pull it along.



And Now a Word from Lexie Marshall, star of Ride With Me:

Have you ever been camping alone?

I'm going to guess most of you are women, and the answer is probably “no.” Women don't usually camp alone. I've done it, and I have to say, I can't recommend it. It's one thing to walk the streets of Seattle or New York or Boston by daylight, strong and unafraid, and quite another to lie awake in a tent in the woods alone and manage not to worry about, well . . . everything. Every noise could be a stranger come to kill you, or a rampaging bear, or a cougar, and you find yourself breathing too fast and wondering, Do they even have bears here? Just how big does a cougar have to be in order to eat someone? And was that guy back at the filling station by the park entrance really leering at me the way I thought he was, or was that my imagination?

It's not really funny, actually. It's just one of those things about being a woman that we have to put up with.

My problem was that I wanted to ride 4,200 miles across the United States on the TransAmerica Trail, and I didn't have anybody to ride with. My parents met and fell in love on the trail back in the BikeCentennial summer of 1976, and I can't even remember a time when my brother and I weren't planning to retrace the journey when we were old enough. We grew up, moved out, went to college, and every year, we'd say, “This is the summer we're going to ride the TransAm,” but every summer we'd put it off. Then last year I was turning thirty, and my brother got married to a very nice woman with acrylic fingernails who wouldn't be caught dead on a bike. And I thought, This is it. I have to go now, or I'm never going to do it.

So I put an ad for a cycling companion on Adventure Cycling's website. They have this “Companions Wanted” column that's like the personals for long-distance cyclists. I figured I could find somebody to ride with -- probably some man, since most of the Adventure Cycling folks are middle-aged, upper-middle-class white guys -- and it wouldn't be a problem. I'm easy to get along with. We could swap stories and share dinner and all that, and we wouldn't have to be best friends or anything. I set up an e-mail account, TransAmAlex@gmail.com -- my name's Alexandra, and my family always called me Alex, rather than Lexie, which is what my friends call me -- and I waited for the replies to start rolling in.

And they did, which was cool. But everybody I corresponded with assumed I was a man, and when they found out I was a woman, they backed out. Apparently, the wives of the country's fifty-something intrepid adventurers don't want their husbands crossing the country with a hot young thing.
Which, okay, fine. I can understand that. But damn it, I'm not a sexual predator or anything, and I really, really wanted to ride across the country. So when the next guy e-mailed me about wanting to ride the TransAm with me -- a guy named Tom Geiger -- I just . . . didn't mention my complicating gender at all. Let him assume wrong, I thought. He'll figure it out on the beach in Seaside, on our first morning, but by then it'll be too late.


Not my finest moment, I know. I felt guilty about it for months. I felt guilty about it right up until I met Tom, actually, and discovered he didn't deserve my guilt, because he was a jerk. He was a bit, fat, tall, dark-eyed, incredibly good-looking jerk, and all of a sudden he was my jerk, and I was stuck with him for 4,200 miles.

And when I told him I just wanted a warm body to pitch my tent next to, you know what he said? He said, “I'm not going to sleep with you, either.”


So I told him I was married. Because, well . . . screw him, right?

That's how I met Tom. As for what happened next . . . you'll have to read the book.

Introducing Ruthie Knox:


Ruthie's Website: Http://www.ruthieknox.com

Ruthie Knox figured out how to walk and read at the same time in the second grade, and she hasn't looked up since. She spent her formative years hiding romance novels in her bedroom closet to avoid the merciless teasing of her brothers and imagining scenarios in which someone who looked remarkably like Daniel Day Lewis recognized her well-hidden sex appeal and rescued her from middle-class Midwestern obscurity. After graduating from Grinnell College with an English and history double major, she earned a Ph.D. in modern British history that she's put to remarkably little use.


These days, she writes contemporary romance in which witty, down-to- earth characters find each other irresistible in their pajamas, though she freely admits this has yet to happen to her. Perhaps she needs more exciting pajamas. Ruthie abhors an epilogue and insists a decent romance requires at least three good sex scenes.


GIVEAWAY

Do you have any meet-cute or meet-awful stories of your own? Tell us about it.

One lucky commenter will be randomly chosen to win a digital copy of Ride with Me. Winners will pick up their copy through Net Galley. Good luck to all!  Make sure you leave an email address so you can be contacted. Giveaway extended until 3/12.

Thursday, February 23, 2012

Historical Fiction Tour Stop: The Book of Lost Fragrances by M.J. Rose



Title: The Book of Lost Fragrances
Author: M.J. Rose
Publisher: Atria Books
Publish Date: March 13, 2012
Source: Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours







Why You're Reading This Book?:

  • You're a fiction fan.
  • You like your historical fiction with a side of mystery.
What's the Story?:

From Goodreads.com: "Jac L’Etoile has always been haunted by the past, her memories infused with the exotic scents that she grew up surrounded by as the heir to a storied French perfume company. In order to flee the pain of those remembrances—and of her mother’s suicide—she moves to America, leaving the company in the hands of her brother Robbie. But when Robbie hints at an earth-shattering discovery in the family archives and then suddenly goes missing—leaving a dead body in his wake—Jac is plunged into a world she thought she’d left behind.

Back in Paris to investigate her brother’s disappearance, Jac discovers a secret the House of L’Etoile has been hiding since 1799: a scent that unlocks the mysteries of reincarnation. The Book of Lost Fragrances fuses history, passion, and suspense, moving from Cleopatra’s Egypt and the terrors of revolutionary France to Tibet’s battle with China and the glamour of modern-day Paris. Jac’s quest for the ancient perfume someone is willing to kill for becomes the key to understanding her own troubled past.the ancient perfume someone is willing to kill for becomes the key to understanding her own troubled past."


My Two Cents:

This book takes you to America, Paris, China and Ancient Egypt. Add a scoop of the supernatural and a handful of mystery and a little bit of romance and you have all the makings of a book that will have you entranced. Once you get into the thick of the book (and it does take a bit to get there so be patient), you won't be able to put it down. The last third of the book found me straining my eyes to read on my Kindle up the dark escalators of the DC metro because I couldn't bear to put the book down quite yet.

The subject matter itself is fascinating. I didn't realize how important perfume had been to civilizations like the Egyptians. It's so interesting that such a thing is so enduring. I'm a bit of a scent junkie myself so to read about all of the different scents was pretty awesome. Jac L'etoile has an amazing nose in the book. She can smell just about anything. The way that Rose describes what Jac is experiencing throughout the book through scent is sort of a cool, different feature. Scent doesn't usually seem to make its way in to too many books. On the downside (but not really), the book made me sort of wish that it was a scratch and sniff book of some kind so I could experience some of the more amazing smells!

This is definitely one of those books where you're going to be anxious for all of the different story lines to come together and eventually they do fall together but it takes awhile for Rose to lay everything out and put everything all together. The wait is definitely worth it!!!  I've talked about my love of authors being able to keep readers on their toes with anticipation of how all of the story lines are going to come together. I thought I started to figure out what was going on sort of with how things were coming together but Rose still managed to surprise.  

Bottom line: This is a great book for history lovers who like a bit of mystery.



Don't Forget to Follow The Rest of the Tour:

 
Monday, February 20th
Review at Attack the Stacks
Guest Post at From the TBR Pile

Tuesday, February 21st
Review at By the By Books

Wednesday, February 22nd
Review at Reading the Past
Guest Post at Savvy Verse & Wit
Thursday, February 23rd
Review at A Bookish Affair
Review at Elle Lit
Guest Post at The Literate Housewife
Guest Post at Love of Books

Friday, February 24th
Review at From the TBR Pile
Monday, February 27th
Review at The Bookworm
Guest Post at Elle Lit
Guest Post at By the By Books

Tuesday, February 28th
Review & Guest Post at The Book Faery Reviews
Guest Post at A Bookish Affair

Wednesday, February 29th
Guest Post at Let Them Read Books
Thursday, March 1st
Review at A Novel Source
Guest Post at A Chick Who Reads

Friday, March 2nd
Guest Post at The True Book Addict

Monday, March 5th
Review at Workaday Reads
Guest Post at Reviews by Molly

Tuesday, March 6th
Review at The Book Garden
Author Interview at A Novel Source

Wednesday, March 7th
Review at Books Devoured
Review at Misfit Salon
Guest Post at Literary Marie

Thursday, March 8th
Guest Post at Workaday Reads
Guest Post at Mrs. Q Book Addict

Friday, March 9th
Review at Reviews by Molly

Monday, March 12th
Guest Post at Books Devoured

Tuesday, March 13th
Guest Post at Bippity Boppity Book

Wednesday, March 14th
Guest Post at Life in the Thumb
Guest Post at Book Fan Mary

Thursday, March 15th
Review at My Reading Room
Review at Man of La Book

Friday, March 16th
Guest Post at Daisy's Book Journal
Guest Post at To Read or Not to Read

Monday, March 19th
Review at Broken Teepee
Guest Post at Debbie's Book Bag

Tuesday, March 20th
Guest Post at My Reading Room

Wednesday, March 21st
Review at Unabridged Chick
Review at Love of Books
Guest Post at The Owl Bookmark Blog
Guest Post at Under the Boardwalk

Thursday, March 22nd
Guest Post at Man of La Book

Friday, March 23rd

Guest Post at Broken Teepee
Author Interview at Unabridged Chick

Monday, March 26th
Review at Booksessed
Review at Ravishing Reads

Tuesday, March 27th
Review at The Paris Blog
Guest Post at Girls just Reading
Guest Post at Kelsey's Book Corner

Wednesday, March 28th
Review at My Bookshelf
Guest Post at vvb32 Reads
Guest Post at CMash Loves to Read

Thursday, March 29th
Review at Ravishing Reads
Guest Post at Books and Needlepoint

Friday, March 30th
Review at vvb32 Reads
Guest Post at My Bookshelf

Monday, April 2nd
Review at Book Den
Guest Post at Diary of an Eccentric

Tuesday, April 3rd

Wednesday, April 4th
Guest Post at Book Den

Thursday, April 5th
Review at Bellas Novella
Review at Drey's Library
Guest Post at Layers of Thought
Guest Post at Alexa Loves Books

Friday, April 6th
Review at Mari Reads
Guest Post at CelticLady's Reviews
Monday, April 9th
Guest Post at Drey's Library

Tuesday, April 10th
Review at Book Nook Club
Guest Post at Mari Reads

Wednesday, April 11th
Review at My Bookish Ways
Guest Post at Reading in Winter

Thursday, April 12th
Review at Luxury Reading
Guest Post at Cheryl's Book Nook

Friday, April 13th
Guest Post at My Bookish Ways
Guest Post at Lesa's Book Critiques
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